The KUMPS-VAN BRIEN family from Brussels

Ernest Jean Pierre KUMPS and his wife Jeanne Josephine Marie (nee VAN BRIEN) came to Tunbridge Wells with their daughters Sylvie (15), Julienne (14), Madeleine (12), Elisa (9) and Jeanne (4) from their home at 239 rue de Merode in Brussels, not far from the Palais de Justice – the Law Courts – where M. KUMPS was employed.

Mme KUMPS was from Lier near Antwerp, and the couple had married in Antwerp on New Year’s Eve 1892.  Daughters Sylvie and Julienne had been employed as shop assistants at the A l’Innovation department store on the rue Neuve in Brussels.

A home was found for them all at 40 Upper Grosvenor Road.

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This 10-roomed house was offered by Miss CANDLER in late October 1914 on behalf of the Society of Friends – a fact mentioned in the Tunbridge Wells Advertiser, but not, so far as I can see, in the Kent & Sussex Courier – and had been the home of a leading member of the Society, Thomas Ashby WOOD, until his death at the age of 79 on 26 August 1914. According to his will, he left the house to his daughter Kate who had looked after him and the house since his wife’s death in 1912 – I’d thought maybe he’d left it to the Society of Friends.

I wonder where his daughter lived while it was home to the KUMPS family and others.  And why it was left to Miss CANDLER to oversee its use as housing for the Belgian families.  Anyone?

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Thomas Ashby WOOD’s wife Eliza  – Kent & Sussex Courier, British Newspaper Archive.

Mr KUMPS became the first President of the Belgian community’s Club Albert when it was set up in November 1914; he was President when the bust of the Mayor was presented to the town in September 1915,  and continued in the role until January 1916 when he joined the Belgian Army and left for the Front.  He was by then 6 months short of his 45th birthday.

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Article from La Metropole d’Anvers (published in London), 8th January 1916 (2)

His family left Tunbridge Wells for France from Southampton in May 1916.

Little Jeanne KUMPS must have made her mark on the town – not least when in March 1915 this “tiny mite of four years” sang the British National Anthem in English at a concert at St Luke’s School – a concert at which all the performers were Belgian refugees resident in the town (Kent & Sussex Courier, 26th March 1915).

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Daughter Julienne KUMPS’ registration document

In July 1917, the Courier reported that Bro. E. KUMPS of the Belgian Army sent fraternal greetings to the “Royal Victoria” Lodge of the Druids.

I have traced the family in the Brussels Censuses at the City of Brussels Archives (3) and find that they all returned safely to Brussels after the war.

I wonder what became of little Jeanne?

 


(1)  Sarah CANDLER and her sisters, Lucy and Phillis, strongly influenced by their Quaker beliefs, were actively involved in Tunbridge Wells in a wide range of political and social causes.  They ran the Woodlands Steam Laundry at 104 Upper Grosvenor Road.  Read more about them on the University of Kent’s Inspiring Women website. Their older sister Elizabeth married an ASHBY but I have yet to find a connection with Thomas Ashby WOOD though I’m convinced there is one – ASHBY was his mother’s maiden name…

(2) www.hetarchief.be

(3) The great thing about the City of Brussels Archives (Archives de la Ville de Bruxelles) is that they are open on a Monday when the National Archives (Archives Generales du Royaume) are closed!

 


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Stanton House, Pembury

A quick post about the house in Pembury occupied by refugees M. and Mme. Albert LEJEUNE-KREGLINGER…

A Tweet today about George Llewelyn DAVIES prompted me to re-visit my research into the family who were linked by marriage to the ROBERTS family of Tunbridge Wells.

The Rev. Albert James ROBERTS had been vicar of Tidebrook Church, and his eldest daughter Mary was married to George‘s uncle, Maurice Llewelyn DAVIES.  Another of the Rev. ROBERTS‘s daughters, Lucy Maud ROBERTS, was on the Tunbridge Wells Refugees Committee.

The family were living on the Langton Road in 1901, and by 1911 Rev. ROBERTS had died and Maud was visiting her brother-in-law Maurice who had been widowered in 1902. I’m not sure where her home was, possibly 61 Upper Grosvenor Road, where, in Kelly’s Directory for 1914, a “Miss Roberts” and a C.H. Roberts (the initials of one of her brothers) are listed as living.

Today I discovered from the England & Wales Probate Calendar that Rev. ROBERTS‘s address when he died in 1905 was Stanton House, Pembury.  That was quite exciting – though probably irrelevant!

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In 1911, Stanton House was the home of South African-born businessman Samuel D’Urban SHEARING and his family.1911-stanton-house_pembury_england-census_15

 

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Mr S. D’Urban SHEARING was President of the Pembury Drill and Rifle Club, and in 1917 Monsieur Albert LEJEUNE became a Vice-President and opened the new Club.

“He hoped that after the war the same unity of purpose and brotherly feeling now existing between the Allies would be extended to mutual help in the development of industry and the establishment of a permanent peace.”

Perhaps the LE JEUNE family were staying with the SHEARING family rather than occupying the whole house.


Postscript : I believe one of their sons and his wife & children were fugitives to England in the Second World War – I have found the following account on the Poole Flying Boats Celebration website : How and why we moved to England in 1941


 

 

 

The refugees who never went home

I have just returned from giving a talk about the First World War “Belgian Colony” of Tunbridge Wells in the Victorian Chapel at Tunbridge Wells Cemetery.

The cemetery is the final resting place of seven of the Belgian exiles who took refuge in our town, and earlier today I visited their graves with local expert Anne Bates who had prepared Belgian flags to mark them, ready for visitors in the afternoon.

We took the opportunity to place flowers on each one and wondered how many years it has been since their memory was honoured.

Four of the graves have headstones but three are unmarked.

The flags, we have left there – they are in Sections B6 and C5, Roman Catholic Sections, not far from the lower entrance on Bayham Road, should anyone care to pass by.


An impressive headstone near to the path is that of 58 year-old Rosalie GEBRUERS-DE PAUW, wife of telephone fitter Sebastien GEBRUERS, who died in the Workhouse Infirmary at Pembury on 26 February 1916.tunbridge-wells-cemetery-004

A la pieuse mémoire de Dame Rosalie Marie DE PAUW épouse de Sébastien GEBRUERS née a Oostmalle (Prov. a’Anvers) Belgique le 26 janvier 1857 décédée a Tunbridge Wells le 26 février 1916.  Priez pour elle

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A few yards away are four more graves, three with monuments, one unmarked.

Two are the graves of Madame Hélène DENYN and her 12 year-old daughter, Emma, the the first wife and youngest daughter of Josef DENYN, the ‘carilloneur’ of Malines Cathedral.

Emma Carolina Maria DENYN died on 28th September 1916, just over 100 years ago, and two days after her 12th birthday, at 3 Eastcliff Road – the family’s temporary home, provided by the Refugees Committee.  Her mother followed just under a year later on 23rd September 1917.  Their graves are one in front of the other, so that standing in front of Madame Denyn’s cross, her daughter is just behind her.

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Ici repose Dame Hélène SCHUERMANS-DENYN

sadly the rest is difficult to read

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(B6/96)

(B6/33)

 

 

 

 

 

A notre regrettée Emma Caroline Marie DENYN née à  Malines (Belgique) le 26 septembre 1904


Next to Emma DENYN is 2 year old Joseph VAN NULAND who died on 1st September 1916 at 154b Upper Grosvenor Road.  His parents were stockbroker Paul Francois VAN NULAND and his wife Marie HANOCQ from chaussée de Turnhout, Antwerp.  Joseph had an older sister Rose-Marie who was born in Tunbridge Wells on 17th October 1915, at which time the family were living at 7 Calverley Park Crescent.

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A la douce memoire de Joseph Louis Marie VAN NULAND [illegible] mars 1914

(B6/32)

On 4th July 1917 another son was born to M. and Mme VAN NULAND.  They named him Joseph Marie Odilon.

 

 

 

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And in an unmarked plot nearby ( B6/90) lies Wilhelmina Florentina VANHERCKE, the unmarried daughter of cabinet-maker Jean VANHERCKE, who died on 1st May 1916 of pneumonia, aged 66 years.

From Ostend, she was living at 11 Linden Park, Frant Hill  with, I think,  her widowed sister Maria TANGHE, Maria’s daughter Germaine, Germaine’s husband Oscar GROVEN, and their baby daughter Gladys.  A married brother lived in Dover where he worked on the railways.  They had stayed near him and his family when they first arrived in England – at that time Germaine TANGHE and Oscar GROVEN were only ‘fiancés’ – they married in Dover on 23rd Feburary 1915.


There are two more unmarked graves – C5/115 and C5/172 tunbridge-wells-cemetery-005-cropped-becker-beneden

7 month old Helene BECKER, youngest daughter of basket-maker Victor BECKER, died on 23rd March 1915 at the General Hospital on Grosvenor Road – she must have been so tiny when the family fled their home at Pont-de-Loup near Charleroi.


And Theodore VAN BENEDEN, a labourer employed at the Church Army Home on Upper Grosvenor Rd, who died of pneumonia on 1st February 1917 at 63 Grosvenor Park.

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May they rest in peace.

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